Tag Archives: 2017

The Art of Enron

Most people can bear adversity; but if you wish to know what a man really is give him power. This is the supreme test.—Robert G. Ingersoll

Unless you happened to work at Vermont’s Ben and Jerry’s in 1985 when the 5 to 1 rule¹ was in effect, America’s corporations, unwittingly or not, promoted a type of culture that is “dog eat dog.” Under such merit-based systems, ambitious employees clock in long hours and rely on a variety of skills to climb the competitive corporate ladder to the highest tier of company leadership, where the best fruits of labor can be enjoyed.

Enron executives took this culture model and its fruits to an unprecedented level. For them, the culture wasn’t confined to activities in Enron’s trading floors and accounting offices; for this precious few, it became a way of life in which nothing was ever enough. Continue reading The Art of Enron

Injustice at Enron’s Bankruptcy and AA&Co Demise: The roles of Michael Chertoff and Sherron Watkins

The collapse of Enron and the conviction of its accounting firm, Arthur Andersen, mark a critical juncture in American business and political life. Not only the accounting profession but corporate America as a whole—and those charged with regulating it—must now confront what has been learned, what is at stake, and what can and should be done to restore public confidence in the integrity of the markets.
Bigger than Enron, Frontline 2002

Do we even remember the rise and fall of the Enron Corporation very clearly? After all, a new generation has emerged since the company’s December 2, 2001 bankruptcy. And, noting the date, did some simply discard that news, since we were then, and are still, adjusting to the devastation resulting from the bombing of the World Trade Center towers?

Enron trademark
Enron trademark, positioned in front of Enron’s Houston Headquarters

We can compare the two events in time, but maybe very little else to compare otherwise. Of course, the collapse of Enron was earth-shaking to many people around the world Continue reading Injustice at Enron’s Bankruptcy and AA&Co Demise: The roles of Michael Chertoff and Sherron Watkins

Enron Trials: Mueller and Weissman in a Frenzied Witch Hunt

General Michael Flynn, former National Security Advisor to President Donald Trump, has every reason to be sweating bullets at present. After pleading guilty to lying to the FBI about Russian contacts, General Flynn is at the mercy of Special Counsel Robert Mueller and his team of investigators. In addition to Flynn, three other henchmen of President Trump’s are in hot water relating to the investigation over Russian interference in the 2016 Presidential Election:

  • Paul Manafort, Campaign Chairman
  • Ricky Gates, General Flynn’s assistant
  • George Papadopoulos, Campaign Foreign Policy Advisor

Andrew Fastow, the former CFO of Enron shown in this month’s movie, might strongly empathize with these men for he was once in their same distressing situation. Continue reading Enron Trials: Mueller and Weissman in a Frenzied Witch Hunt

12 Angry Men vs “The Trial of the Century”

So impactful was Reginald Rose’s Twelve Angry Men that it ignited Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor’s passion for law (Semple, 2010; Vergel, 2010). Multiply adapted from Rose’s 1954 teleplay, director Sidney Lumet’s film version was released in 1957 and is recognized today by IMDb as one of the top ten films of all time. It even received the laudable honor of being parodied by “The Simpsons” in 1994, which is akin to winning the most prestigious of awards (FlimSpringfield, 2016).

Continue reading 12 Angry Men vs “The Trial of the Century”

Henry Fonda, Angry Juror #8: Idealism in its Finest Hour

Sidney Lumet’s film 12 Angry Men is a patriotic movie that portrays America’s legal system in an honorable light. Juror #8, played by Henry Fonda, represents the idealistic citizen who is uncompromising in his stance to do the right thing against insurmountable odds.

Yet, according to Weiser (2016),

The hallowed jury trial is a right enshrined in the Constitution and immortalized in American culture. But these days, said Daniel C. Richman, a professor at Columbia Law School, ‘12 Angry Men is more a cultural concept than a regular happening.’

Continue reading Henry Fonda, Angry Juror #8: Idealism in its Finest Hour

Dr. Martin Luther: Persuader–and Not Simply a Humble German Monk

Filmed in Wiesbaden, West Germany, this month’s movie, Martin Luther (Pichel, 1953), received Oscar nominations in 1954 for Best Cinematography, Black and White, and Best Art Direction-Set Decoration, Black and White.

As one of the producers of this movie, the Lutheran Church in America’s presence suggests a protestant bias, although we expect an unbiased historical accounting from its statement as part of the credits at the beginning of the movie,

This dramatization of a decisive moment in human history is the result of careful research of facts and conditions in the 16th century as reported by historians of many faiths.

Martin Luther, Augustinian priest
Dr. Martin Luther, Augustinian Priest

Often described as “a humble German monk,” Dr. Martin Luther (1483 – 1546) was also a gifted scholar, having attained the highest level of university education. He served as Professor of Theology at the University of Wittenberg for his entire career, and as a Catholic Augustinian Priest until his excommunication by Pope Leo X in 1521. Continue reading Dr. Martin Luther: Persuader–and Not Simply a Humble German Monk